Top 10 Reasons why you need to go see Play it Loud at The Met in NYC

The Met, Play It Loud, Chuck Berry, Gibson ES-350TCourtesy of Joe Edwards, Blueberry Hill, Saint Louis, Mo.

Play It Loud is an exhibition showcasing approximately 130 instruments alongside posters and costumes of many of rock and roll’s greatest. In addition to institutional and private collectors, many musicians are lending their performance and recording instruments to create the best collection possible. Some of the gear here is really a once in a lifetime opportunity to see. It is with that thought in mind that we made this list of reasons that you NEED to go check out this exhibit.

Play It Loud is only running until October 1st so there is still time to go. Where else will you be able to see some of the actual instruments that helped to create a new genre of music that is still relevant today?! Enough ramp up, here are ten reasons we feel you need to check this collection out!

10.) Never Has a Collection Like This Been Exhibited Under One Roof!

If you are into guitars and want to see some of the most historic guitars in Rock History, you need to check this out.

The Met, Wanda Jackson Martin D18

Courtesy of Wanda Jackson

The Met, Bo Diddley, Twang Machine

Courtesy of MoPOP, Seattle

The Met, Bigsby, Bigsby solid-body No. 2

Collection of Perry A. Margouleff

The Met, Jimi Hendrix, Love Drops Flying V Guitar

Collection of William C. Butler, Vanderpool, Tex.

The Met, Eddie Van Halen, Frankenstein

Courtesy of Eddie Van Halen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.) Not Just Guitars

You will see a great collection of guitars, but that’s not all. How about the mandolin that was used on Losing my Religion, or Jerry Lee Lewis’s gold piano and Ian McLagan’s Wurlitzer? You can hear the breakdown from Stay with Me oozing from it.

The Met, Jerry Lee Lewis, Gold Baby Grand Piano

Collection of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Gift of Jerry Lee Lewis

The Met,, Ian McLagan, Wurlitzer Model 200

Courtesy of Lee and Poppy McLagan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.) The Who Shrine

The Met, Play It Loud, John Entwistle, Alembic Bass

Collection of David Swartz

8 String Alembic designed by John Entwistle and Alembic in ’76. This bass along with a Keith Moon drum kit and a few of Pete Townsend’s guitars are on display.

The Met, Play It Loud, The Who, Keith Moon

“Pictures Of Lily” Drumset The Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Given by the estate of Keith Moon Collection of Brad and Diana Rodgers, Epiphone Wilshire Guitar and 1973 Les Paul Deluxe Collection of David Swartz

7.) Play, Find The Bursts!

Yes, Bursts is plural. Go to this exhibit and see a few examples of the most expensive and collectible solid body electric guitars.

The Met, Play It Loud, Keith Richards, Les Paul, The Rolling Stones

1959 Les Paul Standard Collection of Perry A. Margouleff

The Met, Play It Loud, Billy Gibbons, Pearly Gates, Les Paul

1958 Les Paul Sunburst that was once owned by Paul Kossoff and Eric Clapton. Private Collection.

 

 

 

The Met, Play It Loud, Jimmy Paige, Les Paul

“Number One,” 1959 Les Paul Standard Collection of Jimmy Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.) SIX STRING GUITAR HEAVEN

No Matter what you are into, electrics or acoustics, Fender or Gibson, there is something here for everyone. Guitars like Bob Dylan’s Strat when he went electric or Jimi Hendrix’s Woodstock Strat. If Acoustic is your thing, maybe you will like the Martin that Clapton used for his MTV Unplugged or one of George Harrison’s Zemaitis acoustics.

The Met, Play It Loud, Bob Dylan, Stratocaster

Courtesy of Jim Irsay

The Met, Play It Loud, Jimi Hendrix, Woodstock Strat

Courtesy of MoPOP, Seattle

The Met, Play It Loud, Eric Clapton, Tears In Heaven, Martin Guitars

Private collection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met, Play It Loud, George Harrison, Tony Zemaitis

Courtesy of the Harrison Estate

5.) Solid Body Evolution

This is one of the best exhibits. Five Guitars in one case that are the evolution of the solid body electric guitar. This display case starts with a Late 40’s Bigsby to an Epiphone Klunker to a Fender Tele Proto to a 54 Strat to a 58 Les Paul.

The Met, Play It Loud, Evolution Of Solidbody Guitar

Bigsby Collection of Perry A. Margouleff, Les Paul “The Klunker” No. 3, Collection of Perry A. Margouleff, Blueberry Hill, Saint Louis, Mo, Prototype Telecaster, and 1954 Stratocaster Collection of Perry A. Margouleff, 1958 Les Paul Sunburst that was once owned by Paul Kossoff and Eric Clapton. Private Collection.

4.) The Beatles 4-piece Ludwig Drum Kit

This is probably the most iconic drum set in the world. It started a revolution and has been seen by millions. And if that isn’t enough, check out one of John Lennon’s Ricks!

The Met, Play It Loud, The Beatles, Ed Sullivan Show Kit

The Beatles Ringo’s First Ludwig Drum Kit Courtesy of Jim Irsay

3.) Complete Rigs

Check out Jimmy Page’s Led Zeppelin rig used in the ’70s.

The Met, Play It Loud, Led Zeppelin, Jimmy Page

Collection of Jimmy Page

Keith Richard’s ’59 Les Paul and Fender Amps.

The Met, Play It Loud, Keith Richards Rig, Les Paul

Collection of Keith Richards

Plus, Tom Morello’s rig used during his Rage Against the Machine era.

The Met, Play It Loud, Tom Morello Rig, Rage Agains The Machine

Courtesy of Tom Morello

If that isn’t enough, you have EVH’s rig with his legendary Variac’s to help get the Van Halen Brown Sound.

The Met, Play It Loud, Eddie Van Halen

Courtesy of Eddie Van Halen

2.) Tiger and Wolf

The Met, Play It Loud, Jerry Garcia, Tiger

Jerry Garcia “Tiger” Courtesy of Jim Irsay

If I had to pick two of my favorites from the exhibit- 1st would be Jerry Garcia’s tiger. This was Jerry’s favorite guitar and was played from the late ’70s to the early ’90s. It was the last guitar Garcia played publicly with the Dead, at the band’s final performance on July 9, 1995. But that’s not all, deadheads rejoice also included in the exhibit is another Garcia favorite, Wolf. Jerry Garcia played “Wolf” as his main guitar with the Grateful Dead from 1973 to 1979 and last used it on February 23, 1993.

The Met, Play It Loud, Jerry Garcia, Wolf

Jerry Garcia “Wolf” Courtesy of Brian Halligan

1.) SRV Number 1

One of the most iconic guitars from one of the most iconic guitar players of this era. You can see up close all the wear and music that has flowed out of this.

The Met, Play It Loud, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Number One

Courtesy of the Estate of Stevie Ray Vaughan

That’s a wrap ladies and gentlemen. These are ten reasons why you need to go check out Play It Loud! This is more likely than not a once in a lifetime opportunity to see the history of rock and roll in one room. Don’t miss your chance to see Play it Loud now!

Click Here to check out our article on 12 Items You Didn’t Know You Should Own!

Click Here to learn more about the Play It Loud exhibit at The Met!